Happy Blogiversary to Me, to Me.

Six months ago today, I took my lunch and my laptop to Starbucks and launched Sourcerer. I’d kicked off this blog half an hour earlier. I didn’t trust the scheduled posting – I published every post manually that day, and spent a lot of time between posts watching my stats.

Our page views and visitors that day, on all three blogs, tripled my expectations and convinced me to keep going. I haven’t looked back since. I’m not linking to those first posts here — I’ll do that at Sourcerer later today. Here, today, I’m nominating bloggers for the I Am a Part of the WordPress Family Award.

The rules as I understand them are to nominate 10 bloggers, display this image on your blog, and link back to the person who nominated you. That’s my kind of award, so:

wpfamily

If you don’t do awards, no worries. Think of this as me encouraging people to read and comment on your blog, and just keep being yourself. I’ll continue to read whether you acknowledge the nomination or not. Just know that if you are on this list, I love your blog.

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A to Z Day 26: Zeugma

Z

Click for A-Z blog list.

Zeugma is a fun word to say, and a fairly simple concept, but the explanation is a bit complicated, so I’m borrowing one more definition from Dr. L. Kip Wheeler of Carson-Newman University.

ZEUGMA (Greek “yoking” or “bonding”): Artfully using a single verb to refer to two different objects in an ungrammatical but striking way, or artfully using an adjective to refer to two separate nouns, even though the adjective would logically only be appropriate for one of the two. For instance, in Shakespeare’s Henry V, Fluellen cries, “Kill the boys and the luggage.” (The verb kill normally wouldn’t be applied to luggage, so it counts a zeugma.) If the resulting grammatical construction changes the verb’s initial meaning but is still grammatically correct, the zeugma is sometimes called syllepsis–though in actual practice, most critics use the general term zeugma to include both the grammatical and ungrammatical types interchangeably. Examples of these syllepses and zeugmas abound–particulary in seventeenth-century literature:

“If we don’t hang together, we shall hang separately!” (Ben Franklin).
“The queen of England sometimes takes advice in that chamber, and sometimes tea.”
“. . . losing her heart or her necklace at the ball.” (Alexander Pope).

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